World Events

Montana fisherman beats state record for longnose sucker in less than 2 months

Records were meant to be broken.

And one fisherman did exactly that when he reeled in a longnose sucker that measured 19.5 inches in length and weighed 4.21 pounds, according to a report from the Helena Independent Record.

The impressive catch reportedly broke Montana’s state record for the largest longnose sucker caught in Big Sky Country.

RECORD-BREAKING FISH CAUGHT AND RELEASED IN WEST VIRGINIA

Helena resident Austin Wargo is said to have caught the fish on Friday, May 14, in the Holter Reservoir –a “hydroelectric straight gravity dam on the Missouri River,” according to government sources.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

The Helena Independent Record reports that the record-breaking fish was certified by an MFWP biologist over the weekend. 

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Previously, the state longnose sucker record belonged to Jacob Bernhardt from Great Falls. The fish was reeled in from the Missouri River in Cascade County on March 26, according to a press release issued by the Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

Bernhardt’s catch measured 20.1 inches long and weighed 3.42 pounds.

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However, before Bernhardt the longnose sucker state record belonged to fisherman Ray Quigley, who caught his 3.27-pound recordbreaker in Marias River Loma back in 1988.

A longnose sucker background is a cypriniform freshwater fish that is native to North America. The species is found in all three of Montana’s drainages, according the Montana Field Guide.

Longnose suckers can reportedly weigh around five pounds and are “frequently caught fish by Montana anglers,” the guide states.

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Outside of Montana, longnose suckers can be found in Lake Superior (Michigan), Yellowstone Lake (Wyoming), Lake Willoughby (Vermont), Stave Lake (British Columbia, Canada), Rampart Reservoir (Colorado) and Lake Whatcom (Washington).

Source

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